News

CBC News Article on 21 Sep. 2017: some international students fear seeking help for burnout

Hello international students!
I hope your fall semester is going well. I found a CBC News article about international students.
This article is rather depressing, especially when it notes “Most students are encouraged to seek help to combat stress, but international students who are burning out fear that asking for help may lead to deportation”. As a former public college staff / a licensed immigration consultant, I strongly advise students to contact their college or university counsellors if they feel they are burning out. Universities and colleges often have some professional counselors and some Regulated International Student Immigration Advisors (RISIAs). These professional people should be able to offer some help! Do not allow yourself to become isolated.
Good luck with your studies!

Some citizens from Brazil, Bulgaria and Romania are eligible to apply for an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA)

Hello, international students from Brazil, Bulgaria and Romania.
Starting from May 01, 2017, some of citizens form Brazil, Bulgaria and Romania are eligible to apply for eTA. instead of a visitor visa (TRV). But please note that Brazilians, Bulgarians and Romanians who are not eligible to apply for an eTA or who are traveling to Canada by car, bus, train or boat, including a cruise ship, will still need a visitor visa (TRV). For more information, please visit IRCC web site.
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2017/04/canada_s_new_entryrulesforbrazilianbulgarianandromaniancitizens.html

Confusion about the eligibility for Post Graduate Work Permit?

Dear International Students!

In the last few months, we have received many questions from international students about WHO is eligible for a Post Graduate Work Permit.
According to IRCC “Guide 5580 – Applying for a Work Permit – Student Guide“, international students may apply for a post-graduation work permit if they:

– have continuously studied full time in Canada (i.e., studies must have taken place at a Canadian educational institution) and have completed a program of study that is at least eight months in duration at:

a public post-secondary institution; or

a private post-secondary institution that operates under the same rules and regulations as a public institution, receives at least 50 percent of its financing for its overall operations from government*; or

a Canadian private institution authorized by provincial law to confer degrees, but only if you are enrolled in one of the programs of
study leading to a degree as authorized by the province and not in all programs of study offered by the private institution.

– have a valid study permit when you apply for the work permit; and
– have not previously been issued a work permit for post-graduation employment following any other course of study.

*currently, only private college-level educational institutions in Quebec fit that description

If you graduated (or graduating) from a private college, please ask your college whether your college is meeting the definition of “a private post-secondary institution that operates under the same rules and regulations as a public institution, receives at least 50 percent of its financing for its overall operations from government (currently, only private college-level educational institutions in Quebec fit that description)” or “a Canadian private institution authorized by provincial law to confer degrees, but only if you are enrolled in one of the programs of study leading to a degree as authorized by the province and not in all programs of study offered by the private institution”.